The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy

A definite must see when sightseeing in the Kawagoe area. The Kashiya Yokocho conveys the essence and history of Edo even today, and its existence is indispensable to Koedo.


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Kashiya Yokocho’s past and present

The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy

The Kashiya Yokocho is lined with long-standing Japanese-style confectionery stores and is one of Kawagoe's famous sightseeing spots.
Its history dates back to the Edo era.

From around the time of the end of the Edo era to the beginning of the Meiji era, the present day vicinity of the "Kashiya Yokocho" was a place that produced simple sweets enjoyed by the residents of Edo.

It is said that in 1921 when Tokyo suffered severe damage from the Great Kanto Earthquake, it covered the production and supply of Edo sweets such as chitoseame (ame means candy in Japanese), Kintarouame, mizuyoukan (soft adzuki bean jelly) and karintou (deep-fried dough cookies) and shipped them country-wide.

The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy

The Kashiya Yokocho reached its peak in the early Showa era when roughly 70 sweet shops were in existence.
Currently the number of shops has decreased to about 20. However, it is busy every day with visits from tourists and locals.

In 2001, it was selected as one of the Ministry of the Environment’s "Most Tasteful 100 Landscapes”.

In 2001, it was selected as one of the Ministry of the Environment’s "Most Tasteful 100 Landscapes”.

In June of 2015, a total of 6 buildings including sweet shops and private houses were burned down in Kashiwa Yokocho by an accidental fire.

For a time, everyone was worried about what would happen, but it was reconstructed without issue around 2017.
Part of a historical building was destroyed but there are now new sweet shops and restaurants on the former site.

Taking a walk-and-eat tour is also recommended! Stroll around Kashiya Yokocho

There are many Japanese sweets that you can casually eat in Kashiya Yokocho.
It is also recommended as a walk-and-eat spot.

The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy
The Kashiya Yokocho Entrance.
Already, it is overflowing with a nostalgic atmosphere.

When it comes to dango (dumplings) and manju (sweet buns), this is the place! "Kashou Katou"

The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy

"Kashou Katou" is a shop that specializes in ankodama (sweet adzuki bean paste balls) and yokan (soft adzuki bean jelly).
The gable building was constructed in the early Taisho era and has been selected as one of the 100 Kawagoe City landscapes.

The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy
The "ankodama" (sweet adzuki bean paste, sweet potato paste) is famous.
Because they are very popular, if you want to buy them you should get their early.

The artful craftsmanship of the "Tamariki Seika" will take your breath away

The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy

The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy

The Tamariki Seika is a hand-made candy specialty store that was established in 1914.
To this day it still produces handcrafted candies in order to pass down the technique.

The workshop behind the store can be seen through the glass.
Also, although reservations are required, you can enter the workshop and observe the skills of the craftsmen up close.

"Matsumoto Seika" is particular about natural ingredients and flavor

松本製菓

Matsumoto Seika is famous for “mugibou” (wheat flour hardened with mizuame). Mizuame is a Japanese sweetener that literally translates to water candy.
It is a long-standing shop that boasts over 100 years of history.

The hakkaame (peppermint candy) and bekkouame (tortoise shell candy) sold here are all handmade.
The rustic flavor of these sweets is an experience you can’t get from today’s sweets.

A pickle shop in Kashiya Yokocho? "Sandaime Ayaka"

The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy

The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy

It has plenty of pickles that are rarely found in other shops such as soy sauce pickled ginger, squid ink pickled daikon radish and tamari onion.

You can sample almost all of the pickles in the shop.
If you try them you will understand, but their flavor is quite different from the pickles you buy at the supermarket!

Kashiya Yokocho’s oldest store "Yoshioka YA"

Contrary to its flashy name, it is Kashiya Yokocho’s longest-standing store.
Its former name was "Yoshioka Mingei Hinten"(Yoshioka Folk-crafts).

Currently it is no longer a craft store but sells sweets and souvenirs.
Their rusks are highly recommended.
The rusks are made for them by an acquaintance of the owner’s cake store.

A classic Kawagoe souvenir “Nagaifu kashi” (long Japanese dried wheat gluten snacks)

The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy

The sweets come in two sizes, 80 cm and 95 cm.
Many people buy them as souvenirs.

Their sweetness is surprisingly mild.
Only the surface, not the inside, is coated with brown sugar.
I think even people who aren’t big on sweets would probably eat them.

Hot freshly made imokenpi (sweet potato chips) “Umon- An direct seller of Kawagoe kenpi”

The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy

Umon is famous for its imokoi, but this branch is run as a specialty store for imokenpi.
(It doesn’t sell imokoi)

Imokenpi can be eaten as a snack and is quite a popular item for eating while walking.

紫芋ソフトクリーム
It also sells ice cream.
Because the ice cream is also delicious, it is recommended!

We introduced the ice cream here.


In the same building there is also an eel restaurant called "Daikoku" and a Japanese style cafe called "Kumajin".

For a proper lunch go to "Washoku Daikoku"

The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy
Source:Official store website

Daikoku is a restaurant that specializes in eel, Japanese food and kaiseki ryouri (Japanese course meals) that has expanded to the Kawagoe City area.
The Kashiya Yokocho store opened on July 15th 2016.

The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy
Source:Store official website

To the locals it’s recognized as being "a restaurant to go to on special occasions”

Cute manju (Japanese sweet buns) shaped like a kura (cellar) at "Zaumon"

The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy

"Zaumon" sells Kawagoe's newest specialty- "Koedo Kura Manju".

The Kawagoe Kashiya Yokocho (Sweets Alley) is a sweets street that both children and adults can enjoy
"Kura Manju", which is cooked so that is shaped like a kura, has the biggest line up in town.
Contrary to the expectation that the only thing inside of them is anko (sweet adzuki bean paste)... it has a double layer of anko and sweet potato paste.
It is kind of similar to Umon’s “imokoi”

蔵まんじゅう
It’s a perfect souvenir for the workplace as it has good cost performance and is easy to hold!

A full array of old-fashioned sweets at the “Yoshini Seika Confectionery”

吉仁製菓

"Yoshini Seika" is directly opposite from Zoumon. It was founded in 1939.

Although it burned down in the big fire of Kashiya Yokocho in 2015, it has made a splendid comeback!
It mainly sells karumeyaki (honeycomb toffee), but senbei (rice crackers) and imokashi (potato sweets) are also available.

Kashiya Yokocho The scenery before the fire

This is an article I wrote before the fire occurred. I think I will keep it as a record.
Vegetables were often sold here.

八百屋

The older gentleman who made shichimi (Japanese 7 spice) also used to frequent here.

入り口
The entrance to Kashiya Yokocho along the main road.

Access · Map to Kashiya Yokocho

  • a 14 minute walk from the Seibu Shinjuku Line "Honkawagoe Station".
  • a 26-minute walk from the JR Tobu Tojo Line "Kawagoe Station".
  • From "Kawagoe station" exit at the east exit, board the Tobu bus and get off at “Ichibangai”. It is a 3 minute walk from there.

Parking lots around Kashiya Yokocho

There are no dedicated parking lots.
For a list of Times parking lots near Kashiya Yokocho,click here

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